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Can Your Dog Reproduce

  It does not follow that any male puppy will in time be able to sire litters. There are many dogs with only one testicle, and others with none at all. This does not affect them as house pets, but if you are looking for a stud, be sure that both testicles have come down before you buy him. If they are not in place at six months, they never will be. A dog with one testicle can sire litters, but he is working under a fifty-percent disadvantage, and should this fact become generally known, it will react against him in the minds of other breeders.

  A good name is a valuable thing, and your good name with your clients depends on the quality of the pups which you sell them. I know of one lady who bought a "cute little cocker puppy." She didn't ask for his papers, and was only interested in having a house pet. However, she wasn't so greatly impressed a year later when her little puppy weighed sixty-five pounds! Can you imagine what this lady thought of the breeder from whom she got this monstrosity? I'll wager she did not send any friends to his kennel. There are a lot of inferior puppies being produced by breeders who labor under the delusion that they save money by using the dog next door as a sire instead of going to a recognized kennel for the services of a well-known stud.

  The best way to analyze the situation is to get it down to a dollars-and-cents basis. Suppose you spend $250.00 for a stud fee and sell your puppies for $350.00 each. If you have five pups, the gross receipts will be $1750.00. But suppose you use the dog next door. Unless he happens to be of show type, in which case the plan might be satisfactory, nobody but his owner will recognize his name on a pedigree. In all probability his blood lines will not be even distantly related to your bitch, and it would be a matter of pure luck should the pups turn out to be really good type. Not only that, but the psychological effect of having paid a stud fee and having carefully studied the mating will be lacking. Most likely you will set a price of $150.00 or so on these pups, which will give you a gross return of $750.00. In other words, by going about it in the right way your gross is better by $1000.00, and your net, after the stud fee has been deducted (all other expenses are the same) is $750.00 better.

  This is not only doing yourself a favor, but it is keeping faith with your clients and with the other breeders. No breeder respects a competitor who sells puppies for $5.00 or $10.00, because he knows, without looking at the pedigree papers, that the sire of such a litter is not one which will improve the breed. So far as he is concerned, they are just "plain pups." Another way to keep faith with other breeders is to make it a point never to sell a poor-type bitch unless she has first been spayed. In this way you will be doing your part in preventing poor "backyard breeding." Moreover, you will be keeping up the name of your kennels, for if these cheap pups got on the market the name of your own blood line would appear on the pedigrees, which would not do much to raise it in the estimation of either the public or the breeders.
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