Practical Dog Breeding - Free Articles and Information
 
<< Previous    1...   2  3  4  [5]  6    Next >>

Feeding a Stud

  Some people say that a stud should be overfed. This is entirely wrong, for no animal does his best work when fat and lazy. He should be kept in the best possible condition, and this does not mean overfeeding. So long as his health is good he may even be on the lean side, but the important thing is to keep him in top form.

  The number of times a stud should be mated depends to a large extent on the age of the dog. A young dog in good health is more eager than an old one. Some studs have been bred as often as twice a week over a period of many months, but this is not a wise procedure. However, the individual dog can determine this better than any hard-and-fast rule. No dog should be used so often that his physical condition is affected. What might be quite safe for one might reduce another to the point where his health was suffering. Use your common sense.

  Now the question arises, where are you going to keep your dog? If he is to be housed in an unheated kennel, see that it is not damp or drafty. Practically all breeds can withstand cold, but none of them can endure dampness or drafts. Neither should they be put in a warm place one night and out in the cold the next. Plenty of small breeders keep their dogs in the cellar. This is satisfactory in most cases, but they should not be too close to the furnace. Do not, however, simply shut your dog down cellar and forget him.

  Remember, he needs plenty of exercise. A few drops of wheat germ oil in their diet & dog treats is beneficial to both dogs and bitches. This is particularly good for the stud which is not being used regularly, if it is given for a week or so before breeding him. Cod-liver oil is an excellent addition to the daily diet even though the food is a balanced ration. It improves both the coats and the general health.

  In this respect I am lucky, for I live by the sea and am able to get crude cod oil for fifteen cents a quart. You may also be able to get it from inland fish dealers. It will certainly pay you to investigate. Try giving it to one dog, and after a short time, compare his coat with those of the others. Give it to one whelping bitch and not to another, and then compare the coats and bone structure of both litters. When you have carried out these experiments there will not be any doubt left in your mind as to the benefits of feeding cod oil. In my kennels it is routine. All the adult dogs and bitches get their daily dosage, and the puppies are given a smaller amount from the time they are weaned.
<< Previous    1...   2  3  4  [5]  6    Next >>

 

 

 

Subscribe to our free newsletter and we will send you a FREE copy of your very own Dog Owners Guide. 

:

: