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Proper handling of a Stud

  In choosing a stud, care should be taken to be sure that his sex organs, the testicles, are in their proper place. That does not mean that a dog with only one testicle cannot sire a litter. He can, but this is a major fault, and should he be taken into the ring it would register against him. It also puts him at a disadvantage when used as a sire, since his sex organs are only half developed and he is only half as potent as he would be if perfectly formed.

  The proper handling of a public stud includes much more than the actual mating and collecting of the fee. After you have handled a public stud for some time, you will realize how many disappointments you can run into and the difficult situations you are bound to meet. If you are going to make a success of owning and handling a public stud, you must know all about dog breeding. You must also know the dog with which you are dealing and how to handle him during the actual mating. Some dogs will look to you for assistance, while others will brook no interference whatsoever. You must know just what is expected of you by the stud, and be ready and able to give aid when it is needed.

  One of the questions which you will probably want to ask is, how early a young dog can be used as a stud. The usual time for him to begin showing an interest in the opposite sex is around ten months, though I have seen one actually mated as early as nine months. At this time he will begin showing an intense interest in bitches and will become more and more pugnacious with the other dogs around him.

  Mating cockers and others of the smaller breeds is inadvisable before the dog has reached the age of one year. Since a puppy may be entered as such in the shows at six months, this gives him time to get started on his climb to fame before he takes on the more serious work of propagating his race. It also brings him in contact with strange dogs, and teaches him how to behave himself when they are around.

  If he should turn out to be a sensational winner in the puppy classes, I would advise withholding him from stud service until after he has finished his championship. In this way you introduce him to the fanciers with his newly-won laurels giving added interest. However, withholding him in this manner is not necessary from the standpoint of his health. He may be safely bred after he has reached his first year, but extreme care must be taken during his first few matings that no ligaments or muscles are strained. If this happened, it would jeopardize his chances of winning, and at this time that would be a serious setback. It is quite safe for a young dog to be used as a stud at the same time he is being shown, but I would advise not using him in this manner for two days before or after the show.
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